100 YEARS of THE CAJAL INSTITUTE
100 YEARS of THE CAJAL INSTITUTE

This symposium celebrates 100 years of the Cajal Institute, being Santiago Ramon y Cajal his first director in 1920. The Cajal Institute is a center focused in Neurobiology research, belonging to the Spanish Research Council (CSIC), and one of the most veteran research institutions worldwide. 

This is an extraordinary occasion to call public attention to Neuroscience research. Society demands new advances in basic research that can be translated into benefits for patients. Thus, this symposium will show revolutionary findings in the field of functional and system neuroscience with potential impact in translational and clinical research. The symposium counts with top international neuroscientists that will discuss the current hot topics of Neuroscience, and the challenges that need to be achieved in the next years to find new therapeutic strategies to treat brain diseases. 

This special event is free and open to broad audience, from neuroscientists at all different career stages to non-specialized general public, with common interest in how modern neuroscience uses cutting-edge technology to understand and resolve highly relevant scientific questions. Organized by the Department of Functional and Systems Neurobiology of the Cajal Institute, it is aimed to inspire new generation of neuroscientists, as well as to stimulate critical thinking based on scientific data, which due to pandemic situation is being questioned.

SPEAKERS
Idan Segev is the David & Inez Myers Professor in Computational Neuroscience at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research uses computational and theoretical tools to study how neurons, the elementary microchips of the brain, compute and dynamically adapt to ever-changing environments. In recent years, he has worked jointly with several experimental groups worldwide in an endeavour to model a whole piece of the mammalian cortex with the goal of unravelling how local fine variations within the cortical network underlie specific behavioural functions and may give rise to certain brain diseases or to healthy and “individual” brains. [More info]
Alberto Bacci directs the team “Cellular physiology of cortical microcircuits” at the ICM, Paris since 2011. He received a PhD in experimental pharmacology and therapeuthics from University of Milano in 2000, and did postdoctoral work at the Department of Neurology of Stanford University. His research has been and is currently supported by the ERC, Giovanni Armenise-Harvard Foundation, NARSAD. His team aims at gaining detailed information on the properties of neocortical interneurons, using a combination of electrophysiological, cellular, biochemical and morphological techniques. The ultimate goal of his research is to understand the functional relevance of these different neuron subtypes within cortical circuits. [More info]
Elly Hol is Professor of “Glia biology of brain diseases” at the Utrecht University and professor of "Biology of glia and neural stem cells” at the University of Amsterdam. She leads a research group at the University Medical Center Utrecht Brain Center. Her research is focused on the role of glial cells in several brain diseases (Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, schizophrenia and glioma). She is a member of Academia Europaea, member of the editorial board of Glia, chair of the scientific advisory board of Alzheimer Nederland, chair of GliaNed, director of the Neuroscience Master and PhD programs of the Utrecht University Graduate School of Life Sciences, and director of education for the Division Brain at the UMCU. [More info]
Johannes Gräff is Assistant Professor, Nestlé Chair, at the Brain Mind Institute of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, where he directs the Laboratory of Neuroepigenetics. His research is focused on the role of epigenetic mechanisms in molecular processes that govern learning, memory and memory loss, with particular interests in memory consolidation/reconsolidation, Alzheimer’s disease, and long-lasting traumatic memories. He obtained his Ph.D. in 2009 at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and did his postdoctoral work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the supervision of Li-Huei Tsai. He is a founding member of the FENS-Kavli Network of Excellence, a MQ fellow, a NARSAD Independent Investigator and holds an ERC StG. [More info]
Richard GM Morris is Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh (since 1974) and Former Director of Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems and Former Co-Director of Edinburgh Neuroscience. His primary research interest is memory and the development of treatments for those with memory problems. He invented the 'watermaze' as a method to study spatial learning, discovered the role of NMDA receptors in learning, and co-developed the synaptic tagging theory of the persistence of memory. Dr Morris serves as an advisor for a number of international research institutes, research trusts and governmental advisory councils. Latterly he served as Life Sciences Coordinator of a U.K. Government initiative on Cognitive Systems. He is also member of the Council of the European Dana Alliance for the Brain (EDAB) whose mission is public awareness of neuroscience. He has received a long list of honors and awards including the 2016 Brain Prize. [More info]
Michael Heneka is the Director of the Deptartment of Neurodegenerative Disease and Gerontopsychiatry-Neurology, University Hospital Bonn and the Cooperation Unit Leader of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE). His basic laboratory research aims at understanding molecular mechanisms of inflammatory regulation in a variety of neurodegenerative disease by using for example novel preclinical mouse models and state-of-the-art techniques like two-photon imaging, transcriptome analysis and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Additionally, his clinical research is focused on various aspects of neuroinflammation involved in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases with the goal of developing new biomarkers and medical intervention programs. [More info]
Idan Segev is the David & Inez Myers Professor in Computational Neuroscience at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research uses computational and theoretical tools to study how neurons, the elementary microchips of the brain, compute and dynamically adapt to ever-changing environments. In recent years, he has worked jointly with several experimental groups worldwide in an endeavour to model a whole piece of the mammalian cortex with the goal of unravelling how local fine variations within the cortical network underlie specific behavioural functions and may give rise to certain brain diseases or to healthy and “individual” brains. [More info]
Alberto Bacci directs the team “Cellular physiology of cortical microcircuits” at the ICM, Paris since 2011. He received a PhD in experimental pharmacology and therapeuthics from University of Milano in 2000, and did postdoctoral work at the Department of Neurology of Stanford University. His research has been and is currently supported by the ERC, Giovanni Armenise-Harvard Foundation, NARSAD. His team aims at gaining detailed information on the properties of neocortical interneurons, using a combination of electrophysiological, cellular, biochemical and morphological techniques. The ultimate goal of his research is to understand the functional relevance of these different neuron subtypes within cortical circuits. [More info]
Elly Hol is Professor of “Glia biology of brain diseases” at the Utrecht University and professor of "Biology of glia and neural stem cells” at the University of Amsterdam. She leads a research group at the University Medical Center Utrecht Brain Center. Her research is focused on the role of glial cells in several brain diseases (Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, schizophrenia and glioma). She is a member of Academia Europaea, member of the editorial board of Glia, chair of the scientific advisory board of Alzheimer Nederland, chair of GliaNed, director of the Neuroscience Master and PhD programs of the Utrecht University Graduate School of Life Sciences, and director of education for the Division Brain at the UMCU. [More info]
Johannes Gräff is Assistant Professor, Nestlé Chair, at the Brain Mind Institute of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, where he directs the Laboratory of Neuroepigenetics. His research is focused on the role of epigenetic mechanisms in molecular processes that govern learning, memory and memory loss, with particular interests in memory consolidation/reconsolidation, Alzheimer’s disease, and long-lasting traumatic memories. He obtained his Ph.D. in 2009 at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and did his postdoctoral work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the supervision of Li-Huei Tsai. He is a founding member of the FENS-Kavli Network of Excellence, a MQ fellow, a NARSAD Independent Investigator and holds an ERC StG. [More info]
Richard GM Morris is Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh (since 1974) and Former Director of Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems and Former Co-Director of Edinburgh Neuroscience. His primary research interest is memory and the development of treatments for those with memory problems. He invented the 'watermaze' as a method to study spatial learning, discovered the role of NMDA receptors in learning, and co-developed the synaptic tagging theory of the persistence of memory. Dr Morris serves as an advisor for a number of international research institutes, research trusts and governmental advisory councils. Latterly he served as Life Sciences Coordinator of a U.K. Government initiative on Cognitive Systems. He is also member of the Council of the European Dana Alliance for the Brain (EDAB) whose mission is public awareness of neuroscience. He has received a long list of honors and awards including the 2016 Brain Prize. [More info]
Michael Heneka is the Director of the Deptartment of Neurodegenerative Disease and Gerontopsychiatry-Neurology, University Hospital Bonn and the Cooperation Unit Leader of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE). His basic laboratory research aims at understanding molecular mechanisms of inflammatory regulation in a variety of neurodegenerative disease by using for example novel preclinical mouse models and state-of-the-art techniques like two-photon imaging, transcriptome analysis and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Additionally, his clinical research is focused on various aspects of neuroinflammation involved in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases with the goal of developing new biomarkers and medical intervention programs. [More info]
 
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SENC
The Company of Biologist